Jail Movie Review

Jail Movie Poster
Jail Movie Poster
Martin D'Souza By Martin D'Souza | 18 Mar 2017 15:37:15.9370000 IST


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Madhur Bhanderkar's flicks has always been an expose on the underbelly of controversially social relevant issues, and JAIL is one more add to the list. This brings out Neil Nitin Mukesh in is most news-making and challenging role with his character's insightful journey into the dilapidated status of present-day jails and prisoners.

Bhanderkar's consistency with meaningful social subject has met with critical acclaim with accolades but music has never been instrumental in giving it razor-shaped edges. Barring the exception of flamboyantly brazen FASHION, all his films has met with average response musically with his favorite Shamir Tandon being there at the helm of affairs mostly. JAIL adds the names of upcoming Sharib-Toshi along with Tandon's efforts with the surprise package of great Lata Mangeshkar singing mournfully soul track for the flick. It will be the controversial burning issue, path-breaking performances with inputs of absorbing background score that will be garnering major spotlight, rather than melodic amusement, but still surprises are always there waiting to happen.

Can the addition of hot-n-happening Sharib-Toshi be peppier enough to add spice and draw listeners? Can Shamir Tandon's aesthetics be sufficient enough to make this musically happening album? Let's break the shackles of impounding of such "ifs and buts" and analyze the music watchfully...

CHECK OUT: JAIL Movie Preview

After the chartbusting "Maahi" (RAAZ-THE MYSTERY CONTINUES) and rock-infused tracks of JASHNN, Sharib-Toshi carry munificent baggage of Sufi rock with them and infiltrate forcefully with as much as three versions of the album's catchier track "Saiyan Ve". The first version is hot-headed solo performance by Toshi with zingy electric guitar strumming along with drum rattling making engaging prelude. Composed for party dancing, this Sufi-rock number is dominated with hook-line ("Saiyaan Ve O O O Saiyaan Ve...") with least to offer in routine lyrics.

Despite some "heard-before" syndrome in rock arrangements, it has classical affixation in "alaaps" with catchier bass-line giving it catchier outlook to lure listeners. Toshi's peculiar vocals works for the feel but the improvisation comes striking all the way in its "rock version" with Sharib and Neil Nitin Mukesh joining him in tandem. The concoction of bass and electric guitar strumming and jamming is impulsive and infectious too and gels well to create sturdy rock feel. This scores the finest with vocals getting optimum space in loud streams of electronic sounds, pleasing bass-line and thumping drumming. As the pulses races high, the third version comes in the styling of "club-remix" attire with all racy hullabaloo of setting party lovers on tizzy. It's that special and conventional dark-room disco maneuvered club number that is filled with accelerating beat-juggles, DJ spins and scratches to deliver the thump. Go for it!

"Milke Yun Laga", a somber toned rock musical offering tenders the mood to a large extent with quality melodic exhibit, both in arrangements and composition. Sharib-Toshi pulls up another winner in this heartrending emotional number with gloomy ambience epitomizing the travesty of destitute lost in the cruel world. This time its Sharib's loud and imposing voice behind the mike, delivering the needful in appealing tones with eclecticism in grungy rock-metal orchestrations. It powers well with enthralling guitar works (in all playing modes), emanating varying shades of happenings. Even A.M Turaz's wording brings out that sadistic and compelling concoction of melancholic sentiments and works progressively with the beat-patterns of this compelling rock number.



view JAIL movie stills

view JAIL movie stills

Neil Nitin Mukesh gives a powerhouse performance. Easily, his act is worthy of the Best Actor Award in the coming year. Even in his silence, he cries out to you with a deafening roar. His body language and emotions are an absolute stunner. He lends that touch of credibility to his character portraying his vulnerability with an expertise found in veterans.

Arya Babbar as Kabir Malik, a prisoner who works for the underworld, and who scouts for potential sharpshooters in their desperate need to get out of jail is a class act. Studied, and focused, he matches Neil 'frame for frame' with his scenes. Manoj Bajpai as Nawaab, a prisoner who has found favour with the top jail authorities too chips in with a powerful performance. Between these three, they make JAIL what it is.

There are a few loose shots, like Manoj Bajpai's back-story, Ghalib's escape and an old veteran explaining how he landed behind bars despite winning many Government awards. This dilutes the focus and intensity of the film.

However, overall, JAIL is worth a watch.

Rating - 3/5



view JAIL videos

view JAIL videos

It is dark, distressing and deeply disturbing, like most, Madhur Bhandarkar films. After feeble attempts with TRAFFIC SIGNAL and FASHION, Madhur roars in form once again. JAIL will have you thinking.

The National Award winning director, this time focuses on the tragic lives of those behind bars. The brokenness they have to deal with, the foolishness of that 'one-second anger' that led to murder, which they are now regretting or even how the innocent battle for justice. JAIL is one such story that focuses on the innocence of Parag Dixit (Neil Nitin Mukesh) and slowly unwraps the other areas, which need to be addressed to the common man. If you have an appetite for hardcore reality cinema, 'This Is It'!

Parag is living a dream life with a good position in a multi-national and Mansi (Mugdha Godse), a girlfriend who understands his needs. One day, things take an ugly turn when his car is intercepted by the police. His roommate who is travelling with him, urges him to drive faster when he sees a cop van trailing. However, Parag slows down, while his friend jumps out and starts shooting at the police. Too shocked to understand what has happened in a split second, Parag sees his roommate being hit by a bullet and a bag full of cocaine recovered from the backseat.

CHECK OUT: JAIL and the world of Jail in the modern context

It is all a daze for Parag as he is handcuffed and led to the police station and eventually to the lock-up. His only hope of acquittal is his roommate who is in the ICU. His friend had cleverly made deals using Parag's mobile, and all the while Parag thought that it was bad network that had his friend using his phone when at home. As luck would have it, his friend dies and that is the beginning of a fresh ordeal for Parag.

It is not close to what prison cells are but Madhur manages to bring the uneasiness and fear that dwells deep within the prison walls. He touches on corrupt police officials and their nexus between the underworld. But what is most disturbing is that there are many who are languishing behind bars without a proper trial. Some like Parag are even innocent.



view JAIL movie stills

view JAIL movie stills

Neil Nitin Mukesh gives a powerhouse performance. Easily, his act is worthy of the Best Actor Award in the coming year. Even in his silence, he cries out to you with a deafening roar. His body language and emotions are an absolute stunner. He lends that touch of credibility to his character portraying his vulnerability with an expertise found in veterans.

Arya Babbar as Kabir Malik, a prisoner who works for the underworld, and who scouts for potential sharpshooters in their desperate need to get out of jail is a class act. Studied, and focused, he matches Neil 'frame for frame' with his scenes. Manoj Bajpai as Nawaab, a prisoner who has found favour with the top jail authorities too chips in with a powerful performance. Between these three, they make JAIL what it is.

There are a few loose shots, like Manoj Bajpai's back-story, Ghalib's escape and an old veteran explaining how he landed behind bars despite winning many Government awards. This dilutes the focus and intensity of the film.

However, overall, JAIL is worth a watch.

Rating - 3/5


Rating /5

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Movie Cast & Crew
  • Actor: Neil Nitin Mukesh, Mugdha Godse, Manoj Bajpai, Arya Babbar, Chetan Pandit, Ghanshyam Garg and Rahul Singh
  • Lyrics: Ajay Garg, A.M. Turaz, Sandeep Nath and Kumaar
  • Director: Madhur Bhandarkar
  • Music Director: Shamir Tandon, Sharib Sabri and Toshi Sabri

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